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Colorado Ovarian Cancer Alliance | www.Colo-OvarianCancer.org

1777 S. Bellaire Street, Suite 170 | Denver, Colorado 80222

303-506-7014  |  1-800-428-0642

Genetic Testing

What is Genetic Testing?

from Genetics Home Reference, National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH)

“Genetic testing is a type of medical test that identifies changes in chromosomes, genes, or proteins. The results of a genetic test can confirm or rule out a suspected genetic condition or help determine a person’s chance of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. More than 1,000 genetic tests are currently in use, and more are being developed.

Several methods can be used for genetic testing:

  • Molecular genetic tests (or gene tests) study single genes or short lengths of DNA to identify variations or mutations that lead to a genetic disorder.

  • Chromosomal genetic tests analyze whole chromosomes or long lengths of DNA to see if there are large genetic changes, such as an extra copy of a chromosome, that cause a genetic condition.

  • Biochemical genetic tests study the amount or activity level of proteins; abnormalities in either can indicate changes to the DNA that result in a genetic disorder. 

 

Genetic testing is voluntary. Because testing has benefits as well as limitations and risks, the decision about whether to be tested is a personal and complex one. A geneticist or genetic counselor can help by providing information about the pros and cons of the test and discussing the social and emotional aspects of testing.”


https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/testing?show=all

 

Genetic Testing
from National Cancer Institute (NCI)


“Genetic testing looks for specific inherited changes (mutations) in a person’s chromosomes, genes, or proteins. Genetic mutations can have harmful, beneficial, neutral (no effect), or uncertain effects on health. Mutations that are harmful may increase a person’s chance, or risk, of developing a disease such as cancer. Overall, inherited mutations are thought to play a role in about 5 to 10 percent of all cancers.

 

Cancer can sometimes appear to “run in families” even if it is not caused by an inherited mutation. For example, a shared environment or lifestyle, such as tobacco use, can cause similar cancers to develop among family members. However, certain patterns—such as the types of cancer that develop, other non-cancer conditions that are seen, and the ages at which cancer typically develops—may suggest the presence of a hereditary cancer syndrome.

 

The genetic mutations that cause many of the known hereditary cancer syndromes have been identified, and genetic testing can confirm whether a condition is, indeed, the result of an inherited syndrome. Genetic testing is also done to determine whether family members without obvious illness have inherited the same mutation as a family member who is known to carry a cancer-associated mutation.

 

Inherited genetic mutations can increase a person’s risk of developing cancer through a variety of mechanisms, depending on the function of the gene. Mutations in genes that control cell growth and the repair of damaged DNA are particularly likely to be associated with increased cancer risk.


Genetic testing of tumor samples can also be performed…”


https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/genetic-testing-fact-sheet#q1

 

Society of Gynecologic Oncology statement on risk assessment for

inherited gynecologic cancer predispositions

 

Johnathan M. Lancaster, C. Bethan Powell, Lee-may Chen, Debra L. Richardson,

on behalf of the SGO Clinical Practice Committee
a)  H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

b) Permanente Medical Group San Francisco, CA, USA

c) UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco,

    CA, USA

d) The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA

“Women with germline mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, associated with Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Cancer syndrome, have up to an 85% lifetime risk of breast cancer and up to a 46% lifetime risk of ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers. Similarly, women with mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2, associated with the Lynch/Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) syndrome, have up to a 40 – 60% lifetime risk of both endometrial and colorectal cancers as well as a 9 – 12% life-time risk of ovarian cancer. Mutations in other genes including TP53, PTEN, and STK11 are responsible for hereditary syndromes associated with gynecologic, breast, and other cancers. Evaluation of the likelihood of a patient having one of these gynecologic cancer predisposition syndromes enables physicians to provide individualized assessments of cancer risk, as well as the opportunity to provide tailored screening and prevention strategies such as surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery that may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these syndromes. Evaluation for the presence of a hereditary cancer syndrome is a process that includes assessment of clinical and tumor characteristics, education and counseling conducted by a provider with expertise in cancer genetics, and may include genetic testing after appropriate consent is obtained. This commentary provides guidance on identification of patients who may benefit from assessment for the presence of a hereditary breast and/or gynecologic cancer syndrome.”

 

www.sgo.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/SGO-Position-Statement-Genetics.pdf

 

 

Definition: Germline Mutation
from National Cancer Institute (NCI)


“A gene change in a body's reproductive cell (egg or sperm) that becomes incorporated into the DNA of every cell in the body of the offspring. Germline mutations are passed on from parents to offspring. Also called hereditary mutation.”

https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/germline-mutation