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Colorado Ovarian Cancer Alliance | www.Colo-OvarianCancer.org

1777 S. Bellaire Street, Suite 170 | Denver, Colorado 80222

303-506-7014  |  1-800-428-0642

Managing Fear, Anxiety, Depression & Grief

From The National Cancer Institute - https://www.cancer.gov/

“Some patients living with cancer have a low level of distress and others have higher levels of distress. The level of distress ranges from being able to adjust to living with cancer to having a serious mental health problem, such as major depression. However, most patients with cancer do not have signs or symptoms of any specific mental health problem. This summary describes the less severe levels of distress in patients living with cancer, including:

Normal adjustment—A condition in which a person makes changes in his or her life to manage a stressful event such as a cancer diagnosis. In normal adjustment, a person learns to cope well with emotional distress and solve problems related to cancer.

 

Psychological and social distress—A condition in which a person has some trouble making changes in his or her life to manage a stressful event such as a cancer diagnosis. Help from a professional to learn new coping skills may be needed.

 

Adjustment disorder —A condition in which a person has a lot of trouble making changes in his or her life to manage a stressful event such as a cancer diagnosis. Symptoms such as depression, anxiety, or other emotional, social, or behavioral problems occur and worsen the person’s quality of life. Medicine and help from a professional to make these changes may be needed.

 

Anxiety disorder—A condition in which a person has a lot of anxiety from a stressful event such as a cancer diagnosis. The anxiety affects his or her ability to manage emotions, social relationships, and work life. Medicine and help from a professional to manage the anxiety may be needed…..

Patients who show a high level of distress usually find it helpful to talk about their concerns with a  social worker, mental health professional, palliative care specialist, or pastoral counselor.”

 

From:  

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/coping/feelings/anxiety-distress-pdq#section/all